Fantasy Football Hits the High School Classroom

4 12 2009

 

https://i1.wp.com/userlogos.org/files/logos/kamicalo76/ESPN-Fantasy-Football.jpg

Fantasy Football = Econ Homework (http://tinyurl.com/y9olbdj)

For three weeks a year, North Carolina Statesville high school teacher Michael Williams teaches fantasy football as a part of his social studies curriculum.

And now, he’s being honored for it.

Under Williams’ lesson plan, students at Statesville High School hold a fantasy football draft, create their own NFL teams, and keep stats and scores, according to an article on Statesville.com.  

 But this is not just for the love of the game; it’s to teach economics.

Williams concocted the fantasy footbal lesson to teach the economics concept of supply and demand.  At the core of the theory is that supply and demand will allocate resources as efficiently as possible. 

By giving each of his students a $200 budget to manage, and assignments such as graphing player statistics to turn in, Williams was able to demonstrate how an abstract theory is applicable to his students’ world.

http://tinyurl.com/ybmtal4

The theory of supply and demand (http://tinyurl.com/ybmtal4)

“By the end of the project, students walk away understanding concepts related to finance, research, business, math, economic patters, entrepreneurship and more,” Chyna Broadnax said in her article, “SHS teacher scores with lesson plan”.

The North Carolina Council on Economic Education agreed, and Williams is now in the running for their fourth annual Economic Educator of the Year Award.  Though there are two other semi-finalists, it is hard to imagine that Williams could be snubbed — Who wouldn’t want to play fantasy football instead of drawing demand and supply curves?

Advertisements

Actions

Information

One response

2 12 2012
Mike Williams

Thanks for write-up. I finished as runner-up. Apparently they would rather draw supply and demand curves.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: